About Toxaphene

 

Toxaphene is a chemical that is primarily used as an insecticide for cotton crops in the United States of America and in other parts of the world. It is complex chemical sold as a synthetic waxy solid with a piney odor. Toxaphene is a combination of more than 670 different compounds which is commonly found in its yellow to amber waxy solid.

What Types of Industrial Uses Does It Have

The chemical is used as a pesticide for cotton, corn, soybeans, vegetables, and other crops in the United States. The other application of the pesticide is to control ectoparasites including mange, ticks, lice, and flies on livestock. It is also used in lakes and streams to control undesirable fish species. Toxaphene is a nonsystemic contact and stomach insecticide which is often used together with other pesticides for better results.

How Does Toxaphene Get into Your Drinking Water

The insecticide can get into your water source through runoff or leachate used on crops or livestock. The rainy season can also contribute to the runoff of the pesticide. If you are using a private well, the contaminant may reach your water supply during heavy rainfall. Unlike other contaminants, Toxaphene remains in the soil for more than 14 years. As a result, private wells near agricultural sites are prone to leachate and runoff. If you’re worried about potential contamination, check your water supply by running a water test.

What Are the Health Risks Associated with Toxaphene

Exposure to the contaminant will make the individual experience problems with their kidney, liver, or thyroid. Continuous consumption of drinking water with Toxaphene above the maximum contamination level goals will increase the risk of cancer. Humans who drink Toxaphene-contaminated water may experience damages to their lungs and nervous system. The chemical is highly toxic which may lead to death if consumed at higher levels. Individuals who continuously drink the contaminated water may increase the risk of liver and kidney cancers.

What is the EPA’s Standards for Toxaphene in Drinking Water

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the maximum contamination level goals (MCLG) for Toxaphene is zero. Contaminants in the water can either be physical, chemical, radiological or biological substances. If the levels of the contaminant present in your water is higher than the MCLG set by the EPA, you must contact your water provider or local water authorities to address the water issue.

What Treatment is Recommended for Removing Toxaphene from Drinking Water

Granular activated carbon (GAC) can be used to treat drinking water with Toxaphene that is below 0.003 mg/L or 3 ppb. The filter medium can remove the contaminant and protect your loved ones from the health effects of the synthetic chemical.

Another way to remove the pollutant from your drinking water is with an effective water filtration system. AquaOx’s seven-stage filtration system is more than capable of separating and eliminating any type of impurities in the feed water. A whole house water filter system is an effective solution to your water issues. Maintain high-quality drinking water with a reliable water filter system so you can keep your family safe and healthy at all times!

From The Agency of Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

CAS#: 8001-35-2

Public Health Statement PDF PDF Version, 345 KB

Toxaphene is made by reacting chlorine gas with a substance called camphene. The resulting product (toxaphene) is a mixture of hundreds of different chlorinated camphenes and other, closely related chlorinated terpenes.

Toxaphene is usually found as a solid or gas. In its original form, toxaphene is a yellow to amber waxy solid that has a piney odor.

1,1-Dichloroethylene (Vinylidene Chloride)

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