About Benzo(a)pyrene

 

What is Benzo(a)pyrene?

Benzo(a)pyrene is one of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs, found in most incomplete burnt organic matters like grilled meat and coal tar. It is the result of organic matter burnt at temperatures between300 C and 600 C.

What Types of Industrial Uses Does it Have?

While they are commonly found due to the result of the combustion of organic matters, they are not produced or sold commercially. Burnt residential wood is among the primary source of this PAH. It is also a result of all types of smoke in the air.

How Does Benzo(a)pyrene Get into Your Drinking Water?

The substance can get into your drinking water by leaching into water systems.

What are the Health Risks Associated with Benzo(a)pyrene?

There are several health risks associated with benzo(a)pyrene including reproductive difficulties and the increased risk of acquiring cancer. Individuals exposed to the chemical compound in their drinking water at higher levels may experience one or both of the health risks mentioned.

How Common is Benzo(a)pyrene in Water?

Since it is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon or PAHs, it is a widespread environmental contaminant present in many water systems around the world.

What is the EPA’s Contamination Level Standards for Benzo(a)pyrene in Drinking Water?

The drinking water regulation set by the Environmental Protection Agency or EPA for benzo(a)pyrene is zero. The maximum contaminant level or MCL for the substance is at 0.0002 mg/L or 200 nanograms/L.

What is the Best Reduction Media for Removing Benzo(a)pyrene from Drinking Water?

A water filter system with granular activated carbon (GAC) can effectively remove the contaminant benzo(a)pyrene to below the MCL of 0.0002 mg/L or 200 nanograms/L. Water filter systems like AquaOx designed with multistage filtration systems are your reliable first line of defense against chemical contaminants. Protect yourself and your loved ones from the harmful effects of water pollutants with a whole house water filter system. Call now and learn more about how we can keep your family safe!

Chemical Names: Benzo[a]pyrene; 3,4-Benzopyrene; 50-32-8; BENZO(A)PYRENE; Benzo[pqr]tetraphene; 3,4-Benzpyrene
Molecular Formula: C20H12
Molecular Weight: 252.316 g/mol
InChI Key: FMMWHPNWAFZXNH-UHFFFAOYSA-N
Drug Information: Therapeutic Uses  FDA UNII
Safety Summary: Laboratory Chemical Safety Summary (LCSS)
Benzo(A)pyrene is a potent mutagen and carcinogen. It is a public health concern because of its possible effects on industrial workers, as an environmental pollutant, an as a component of tobacco smoke.
3,4-Benzpyrene is a crystalline, aromatic hydrocarbon consisting of five fused benzene rings and formed during the incomplete combustion of organic matter. 3,4-Benzpyrene is primarily found in gasoline and diesel exhaust, cigarette smoke, coal tar and coal tar pitch, charcoal-broiled foods and certain other foods, amino acids, fatty acids and carbohydrate pyrolysis products, soot smoke, creosote oil, petroleum asphalt and shale oils. This substance is used only for research purposes. 3,4-Benzpyrene is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen. (NCI0

Benzo[a]pyrene, also known as 3, 4-Benzopyrene or 3, 4-BP, is classified as a member of the Benzopyrenes. Benzopyrenes are organic compounds containing a benzene fused to a pyrene(benzo[def]phenanthrene) ring system. Benzo[a]pyrene is formally rated as a carcinogenic (IARC 1) potentially toxic compound. Benzo[a]pyrene is a crystalline, aromatic hydrocarbon consisting of five fused benzene rings and formed during the incomplete combustion of organic matter. Benzo[a]pyrene is primarily found in gasoline and diesel exhaust, cigarette smoke, coal tar and coal tar pitch, charcoal-broiled foods and certain other foods, amino acids, fatty acids and carbohydrate pyrolysis products, soot smoke, creosote oil, petroleum asphalt and shale oils. This substance is used only for research purposes. Benzo[a]pyrene is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen (NCI05). Its diol epoxide metabolites (more commonly known as BPDE) react and bind to DNA, resulting in mutations and eventually cancer. It is listed as a Group 1 carcinogen by the IARC. In the 18th century a scrotal cancer of chimney sweepers, the chimney sweeps’ carcinoma, was already connected to soot.

1,1-Dichloroethylene (Vinylidene Chloride)

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